Active Longevity

‘Life’s too short’ seems to justify a lot of bad habits and behaviours. If you debate a smoker about the downsides of smoking he may reply with ‘you could be run over by a bus tomorrow’ or ‘my uncle Frank lived to 93 and he smoke at least 20 a day for 80 years’. Neither valid points but people are very good at justifying things to themselves. Something that generated an interesting conversation with a friend of mine the other day was whether living a long life was worthwhile – many think of living a long life as being sat in a nursing home waiting to die for several decades. When I think of a long life I think of being healthy, active, mobile and generally feeling good for as long as possible.

Being in my mid-thirties many of my friends are married with kids and have been letting themselves go, as it is seemingly acceptable for dads of a certain age to do. Many have ‘minor’ health problems such as digestion issues and bad backs but none are hospitalised with anything life threatening. They seem to see this as inevitable and whilst I’d agree that ageing is unavoidable I’d argue that it can be delayed significantly. I follow Laird Hamilton on Instagram and he recently celebrated his 53rd birthday and he is incredibly active as a big wave surfer and has muscle definition most 25 years olds would be envious of. There are a lot of people significantly prolonging their period of active longevity through various methods of nutrition, exercise, sleep, mindfulness and various ‘bio-hacks’.

What gets most of us

“If you’re over 40 and don’t smoke, there’s about a 70 to 80% chance you’ll die from one of four diseases: heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, cancer, or neurodegenerative disease.” – Peter Attia (if you don’t know who Peter is Google him)

 

 

All the diseases mentioned in the quote above are at least influenced by lifestyle. If you’re very unfortunate your genes can significantly increase your risk of getting these diseases but for most of us we can increase our quality and duration of life by living healthier lives. Also most of them creep up on us fairly slowly so give us plenty of warning to do something about it – although most of us ignore the symptoms. For example some would argue heart attacks are very sudden but I’d suggest that symptoms of increased risk of heart disease, such as obesity, are very visible for a long time before the heart attack gets you.

What am I Doing About it?

For me nutrition is the number 1 factor to address as I think it isn’t too difficult to significantly improve things for most people and it can move the needle the furthest in terms of positive impact. (nb unless you smoke cigarettes in which case make stopping that your priority!)  After gradually improving my diet for several years I’ve now settled on something I think works well for me which is The Perfect Health Diet (Google it!) with 2 or 3 periods of Ketosis per year. I’m deliberately not going into too much detail on the subjects mentioned as I’ll pick up on them in other post or you can fine information online.

With exercise I think there are a few areas to address as you get older and markers to be aware of. Mobility has become more and more important to me so Gymnastic Strength Training has become the cornerstone of my workouts. I think maintaining (or improving) muscle mass without restricting mobility or stressing the body too much is important. For this I do occasional deadlifts (only once every 2 weeks to avoid too much stress) and some HiiT training that involves Kettlebells and weights. I’ve cut steady state cardio out completely other than for a few minutes of warming up. I’ve another post that goes into more details on my exercise programs here. For VO2 max the HiiT takes care of that and I now also do intervals on a static resistance bike once every 2 weeks – this gives me a good way of tracking progress. If exercise has never been your thing find something that works for you – even going for a walk can be significantly better than doing nothing.

Sleep has long been very important for me and is often overlooked. To improve sleep I’ve introduced the following measures:

  • Blacked out my bedroom windows so it is genuinely dark at night
  • Play white noise during the night which helps eleminate any background noises that may wake me up
  • Made sure I don’t look at any blue light emitting  screens within about 2 hours of bedtime
  • Kept to regular bedtimes as far as possible (i.e watching one more episode of a box-set is not a reasonable excuse to stay up but going out for a friend’s birthday at a weekend is)
  • Minimised things like caffeine and alcohol too close to bedtime

There are other areas that I am keen to explore as I age. Another area that is overlooked is mental health – my work keeps my brain engaged on a regular basis and I also read a lot – both fiction and non-fiction which I think is sufficient for now. Another thing that is thought to maintain a healthy mind as you age is to learn something new such as a language or musical instrument so this will be something I explore in the not too distant future. Meditation and mindfulness also seems to be getting a lot of press at the moment and this is worth exploring. I find sitting and meditating quite difficult and prefer to go for a walk or do something slightly more active – I’m not sure of the impact of this compared to more typical meditative practises but I find it easier to process my thoughts this way and it gets my outside and moving. I will give mediation another go at points in the future and from listening to others who practise regularly it is often something that doesn’t take that well the first few attempts so I’m happy to revisit.

My measure of success will be how active I am as I age. I plan to still be surfing and working out well into my old age but only time will tell how successful I’ve been.