The Power of When Book Review and Circadian Rhythms

I’ve worked out over the years that I get a lot more done first thing in the morning (between around 6am and 9am) than any other time of day. According to Dr Michael Breus, author of The Power of When, this aligns with my Lion Chronotype! This might be the case but it also coincides with when no-one else has really started calling or emailing me so I don’t get interrupted like I do later in the day. After listening the-power-of-whento Dr Breus on Ben Greenfield’s Podcast I was prompted to pick up his book.

There are some interesting ideas relating to our body clocks, different Chronotypes and the best time to do various things throughout the day. However I’m not sure I’d recommend the book too strongly as a lot of the information I found slightly irrelevant and the rest is available on the Power of When website (The Power of When website) and Ben Greenfield’s podcast (https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/podcasts/) for free. A more detailed review of the book can be found below but I would recommend checking out Greenfield’s Podcast and if you’re into ‘health-hacks’ he has some other really interesting material there.

In the Power of When book Dr Breus reframes conventional wisdom of ‘early birds’ and ‘night-owls’ into 4 categories he calls Lion, Bear, Wolf and Dolphin, which he calls Chronotypes. The book and Ben Greenfield’s podcast on the subject cover these in more detail but Lion’s tend to rise early and be more responsive and productive in the morning whilst tiring early in the evening. Wolves on the other hand struggle with early starts and stay up later into the night. In my opinion these types of classifications tend to be on a spectrum rather than distinct categories but I can out as a Lion in the Chronotype quiz (fairly near the Lion / Bear border!). The book and Ben Greenfield’s podcast on the subject cover these in more detail but Lions tend to rise early and be more responsive and productive in the morning whilst tiring early in the evening.

Book Highlights:

For me the quiz, which is linked to above, was fairly interesting to find out what Chronotype best fit with me and the characteristics of that Chronotype. I think some people who may struggle with sleeping or feel tired during the day may find that some awareness of your natural body and hormonal rhythms would be useful. It may even prompt some people to restructure their day for more productive.

The bulk of the book is looking into any activities you may do in a typical day and then suggests when it might be best to try and complete those activities and why, for each Chronotype. So they cover relationships, fitness, health, sleep, eat and drink, work, creativity, money and having fun.

I found some of the later sections on Chrono-seasonality interesting. The premise being those living in places where the length of days and nights varies dramatically between winter and summer will typically want to sleep more in the winter and less in the summer. In the UK, where I live, we get very short winter days and short summer nights. I decided to black out my windows as I found that in the summers, when it gets light around 4am, meant I slept quite poorly. I’ve also been fortune to travel to some tropical destinations and found I’ve always slept really well. For example at Christmas I was in Costa Rica and I typically woke up with sunrise around 5.30am, was outside most of the day getting tons of natural light and then crashed out around 9.30pm which is a few hours after sunset.

Limitations:

One point is I felt that some sections seemed a bit surplus to requirements and actually the bulk of the interesting stuff could have probably been covered in an article. So it felt sometimes like the author included anything and everything to pad the book out.

I think the main limitation of the book is that some of the recommendations are a little unrealistic for some people and our lives get in the way. For example, I think sleep is a really important part of being healthy and something most people don’t get enough of. I’ve got lots of friends who have stressful jobs and young kids and simply don’t get enough sleep. In Dr Breus’ book he advocates a sleep pattern and trying to stick to that even at weekends when some may like to stay in bed longer. In my humble opinion if you’ve only slept 4 hours a night Monday to Friday then I would sleep as much as possible at weekends to catch up. Obviously the optimum strategy  is consistent bedtimes and wake up times that fit with your natural body clock but that isn’t realistic for most. This is true for a lot of other recommendations in the book – most people have fairly strict schedules when it comes to work hours, when kids need to be dropped off and collected from school, etc….. so simply can’t change most of this schedule. That said if these things are meaning you aren’t sleeping enough then a dramatic life change – like moving house or changing jobs – is certainly worth considering.

If you want to check the book out you can buy it on Amazon here – the Power of When – but I’d recommend instead listening to the relevant podcast and taking the quiz as linked to above before doing so.

 

 

 

Author: LucasBanks

I am a small business owner with interests in lifestyle design, fitness, health and travel.

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